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Inside Antwaun Sargent’s Hyperspeed Art-World Ascent

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Inside Antwaun Sargent’s Hyperspeed Art-World Ascent

On the Thursday after Labor Day, the Gagosian gallery held a dinner at Altro Paradiso, a haute pasta spot in New York’s SoHo. Each year that September evening is a rite of passage in the art world. The Chelsea galleries throw open their doors to the big fall shows, the public floods the blocks between 10th and 11th Avenues, and a select few get invited to dinners to celebrate it all, with cocktails flowing late into the evening.

Of those galleries hosting dinners, Larry Gagosian’s is the biggest, with 19 locations around the globe. That evening the Houston-based artist Rick Lowe had debuted a suite of paintings at Gagosian in his first New York solo show, which had come on the heels of his inclusion in the Whitney Biennial earlier in the year. A line snaked down West 24th Street, and staff had to ensure passage for certain VIPs: Met director Max Hollein, Brooklyn Museum director Anne Pasternak, former cultural commissioner Tom Finkelpearl, the Ghanaian British architect Sir David Adjaye. The opening was set to close at 8 p.m., but by 8:30 the gallery was still thronged. Lowe, 61, finally arrived at Altro around 9, flanked by a dozen family members from Alabama, many of whom had never been to New York City. The restaurant was crowded with well-wishers. David Breslin, who would be announced as the new modern and contemporary curator at The Met in a few weeks, was chatting with the artist Cy Gavin. Gagosian COO Andrew Fabricant ate at a table stuffed with collectors. The artist Awol Erizku held court at another without ever removing his Marni sunglasses.

Coat by Bottega Veneta jacket and pants by Bianca Saunders shirt by Bode hat by Esenshel sunglasses by Gentle Monster.

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At the center of it all sat the show’s curator, Antwaun Sargent, who joined the gallery as a director at the start of 2021. Dressed in an outfit typical of his style—Gucci loafers with a Comme des Garçons jacket and Esenshel wool cap—Sargent occupied a seat reserved for Tyler Mitchell, the young photographer whose own Sargent-organized show at Gagosian would open the following week in London. Mitchell was occupied for the evening at a dinner hosted by Matthieu Blazy, creative director of the Italian fashion brand Bottega Veneta, at The Strand bookstore.

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“Believe me, if I didn’t have to be here, I would be there—can you believe it, a Bottega dinner at The Strand?” Sargent said, his eyes wide.

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Sargent is 34 years old and speaks with the authority of someone much older while still exhibiting the excitability of a Gen Z TikTok star. His proclamations, which he can pose as outrageous provocations without indicating that his tongue is fully in his cheek, often end with a dramatic upswing in pitch. He’s lithe, a former cross-country runner who still bikes hundreds of miles a week, and often coils his body as he begins a story, affecting a pounce when he hits his crescendo.

At Altro, it was difficult for tablemates to shift the subject as Sargent opined, sipping a negroni and then a second negroni. We discussed the sheer improbability of a dinner for a Lowe show at Gagosian, the world’s most sales-obsessed gallery. The artist’s practice has long been concerned with community organizing in Houston’s Third Ward, about as far from the transactional temple of Gagosian’s white cube as you could get. Yet Sargent had landed him.

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“In the middle of the pandemic, I called Rick and I said, ‘I heard you’re making paintings,’ ” he told the audience at the dinner in an all-eyes-on-me toast that had been preceded by screams of “Antwaaaun.”

It was, in many ways, Sargent’s night as much as the artist’s—a characterization the curator would strenuously disagree with, telling me in the hours leading up to the event that “Tonight is all about Rick, it’s about Rick.” Even so, as those pre-toast chants indicated, it was also undeniably Sargent’s stage. In his two brief years at Gagosian, Sargent, who not so long ago was scraping together rent writing online, has become one of the more fawned over, buzzed about, and mystifying forces in the commercial gallery world.

Sargent’s trajectory from outsider to consummate insider has come amid a movement to bring Black artists more into the programming at blue-chip galleries and top-flight institutions, where for centuries they’ve been marginalized or not shown at all. No one has done this more visibly than Sargent, becoming an art world micro-celebrity along the way, with nearly 100,000 Instagram followers. Openings for shows he has curated have looked more like concerts, with young kids spilling out into the streets, generating waves of press and celebrity attention. When Jay-Z stopped by the gallery’s London outpost during the Sargent-staged show “Social Works II,” he was given a private tour by Sargent.

Inside Antwaun Sargents Hyperspeed ArtWorld Ascent

As dessert arrived around midnight, Sargent showed little inclination that he would soon be heading back to the apartment in Downtown Brooklyn he shares with a roommate. In a few days’ time, he was set to fly to London to start installing the first Gagosian show for Mitchell, a major step in the photographer’s continued ascendance.

In one of our several interviews, in early September, I asked Sargent about the place he now occupies among the tippy top of the art market’s highest elevation, and how exactly he reached it despite the odds stacked against him—and some forces still at play.

“I do understand that there is a space that I carved out, and I am sensitive to that,” he said. “If you would’ve asked Antwaun what he would be doing when you’re 33, I would’ve never said this. Never in my life would I have said this.”

“You get attention, people hate. But no one has done it to my face.”

For the last few years, many major institutions and blue-chip galleries have gone out of their way to correct the long-standing inequity of Black artists in programming and collections—between 2008 and 2018, just 2.37 percent of acquisitions at 30 prominent American museums were of work by Black artists. Since then, the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Brooklyn Museum both deaccessioned works by white artists in order to have an endowment to acquire works by women and artists of color. Black artists, especially those who work in the field of figurative painting, have seen their prices skyrocket on the secondary market and have waiting lists for work on the primary market so long that even some of the world’s top collectors can’t access the work.

Sargent is arguably the most recognizable face of this movement, a red-carpet-walking social-first curator-slash-dealer cloaked in custom Bode jackets and Issey Miyake pleats. “Young Gifted and Black,” a show of work from the collection of former media executive Bernard Lumpkin and his husband, Carmine D. Boccuzzi, that Sargent cocurated with Matt Wycoff, has been touring for three years and is currently on view at the Manetti Shrem Museum of Art at UC Davis. Sargent organized “Figures of Speech”, the massive exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of work by the late Louis Vuitton designer Virgil Abloh that saw enterprising streetwear dealers buy out gift shop merch to flip at resale. This year Sargent was asked, with Aimee Ng, to put together a show of paintings by Barkley L. Hendricks at the Frick, the first time a Black artist has had a show at the museum. In the fall, Sargent taught a photography course at Yale, a fact he casually dropped as he tracked down our Uber outside the Brooklyn Museum one afternoon this past summer after a walk-through of the Abloh show where he was gawked at by the designer’s young devotees.

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“You get attention, people hate. But no one has done it to my face.”

Inside Antwaun Sargents Hyperspeed ArtWorld Ascent

As he’s gone about his work, Sargent has overhauled the typical notion of an art curator as an egghead entombed within the institution. He is out on the town constantly. When he released the 2019 book The New Black Vanguard, it came with a signing in Milan hosted by Gucci, attended by Tyler, the Creator; Arthur Jafa; and Maurizio Cattelan. In March, following the Academy Awards, he attended Vanity Fair’s after-party, then moved on to Madonna and Guy Oseary’s bash, then went to Jay-Z and Beyoncé’s at the Chateau Marmont, then straight to his Sunset Tower suite to retrieve his bag. He had to be back in New York for a dinner honoring Lowe’s inclusion in the Whitney Biennial. Then he was off for a talk at Savannah College of Art and Design alongside Mitchell, and then Venice for the Biennale, posting an Instagram pic in a pink silk three-piece Gucci suit.

“Antwaun has always been stylish, he’s always been in fashion, he’s always been in music, he’s always been in multiple circles.… Me and Antwaun, we used to say we’re like the Future and DJ Esco of the art world,” Erizku told me, name-checking the trendsetting Atlanta rapper and his producer-manager.

The comparison of Sargent, who has worked to carve out his own lane in his own style and been handsomely rewarded as the industry caught up, was apt. For years, Sargent was a freelance critic, writing for The New York Times and The New Yorker. He has reached his lofty curatorial perch at the world’s most powerful commercial gallery without the usual MFAs and PhDs—and without climbing the ladder from front desk to assistant to dealer to director.

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To many in art’s old guard, this deems him unworthy. That this concerns the most air-kissed echelons of the art world, few inhabitants would even voice their criticisms for attribution, but suffice it to say Sargent has his haters, and they typically have two or three lines of complaint. From speaking to a number of arts professionals, many think it’s a bit much to proclaim him a genius for finding market-friendly Black artists and selling their work to loyal Gagosian clients under the aegis of “Black social practice”—especially if he’s making money doing so. Some scholars of photo-based work, meanwhile, have knocked his choice of artists, saying he tended to elevate his friends, who work mostly as—the horror!—fashion photographers. As for the crowds he tends to attract to his openings, well, some find it distracting at best, PR at the worst—as if pursuing populism was the equivalent of the blue-chip galleries turning into the Museum of Ice Cream. Or some say that Sargent is too quick to appear on a red carpet or front row at a fashion show to be treated like a serious curator. As one source put it to me, “Antwaun Sargent was on Gossip Girl. Can you ever imagine Harald Szeemann on M*A*S*H?”

“He’s able to bridge Park Avenue and Bushwick, right?… He’s able to connect the East Side with East New York.”

Then there are the literal critics. In a splashy but quietly devastating review, The Times’s venerable Holland Cotter wrote, “Gagosian is, of course, deeply inside that world and deeply conventional in every way. In fact, the single most surprising thing about ‘Social Works’ is finding it there at all.” The small but influential Manhattan Art Review panned the same show—hard. “At root, the problem is that there’s a persistent assumption that the work has meaning by virtue of cultural associations that stand outside of the artwork’s own qualities,” the site’s much-feared author, Sean Tatol, wrote.

Sargent said he’s aware of the critiques, if indifferent.

Artforum has never reviewed or written about anything I’ve ever done. Ever,” he told me. “I’ve been doing this for 10 years. And…I’ve been doing this at a scale that no one has been doing.… So, I think there might be some hateration over there. You get attention, people hate. But no one has done it to my face. ” (In a statement, Artforum editor in chief David Velasco said: “Antwaun Sargent’s writings and exhibitions have been noted in various parts of the magazine. The reviews section is small, and there are hundreds of shows each month competing for attention. We miss many worthy exhibitions all the time.”

Nor has it slowed his ascent. After his multishow takeover of Gagosian’s gallery at Park Avenue and 75th Street, he’ll stage an edition of “Social Works” at the gallery’s Beverly Hills space, followed by two solo shows in Los Angeles, another complete takeover. “Antwaun is a Renaissance man, what the consultants call an ‘ambidextrous leader,’ and what I mean by that is he is truly interdisciplinary,” says Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, the $16 billion art and social justice fund. “And I think he’s a great curator. He’s a beautiful writer. He is a capitalist. All of those things are part of his identity, and he wears it with pride.”

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FASHION

Top Fashion Influencer: Ethan Glenn

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Top Fashion Influencer: Ethan Glenn

Ethan Glenn is a fashion and lifestyle influencer who has made a name for himself in the fashion industry with his modern sense of style. He has become a go-to source for fashion advice and inspiration to many, with his over 500K followers on TikTok and Instagram.https://www.instagram.com/p/ClJ6Qz_y_Bv/embed/captioned/?cr=1&v=14&wp=548&rd=https%3A%2F%2Ffashionunited.com&rp=%2Fnews%2Ffashion%2Ftop-fashion-influencer-ethan-glenn%2F2023011351691#%7B%22ci%22%3A0%2C%22os%22%3A502562.10000000894%7D

One of the things that sets Ethan apart from other influencers is his incorporation of streetwear and vintage into his outfits. He isn’t afraid to mix and match colors and textures creating looks that are both eye-catching and easygoing.

Ethan’s personal style can be best described as a blend of classic and contemporary. He often pairs classic tailored pieces, like shirts and trousers with trendy streetwear items such as oversized hoodies and sneakers. He also has a knack for mixing high-end designer pieces with more affordable, off-beat items. He can be seen rocking a Patagonia fleece with a pair of vintage Levi’s, or an Acne Studio scarf with a streetwear t-shirt.

Another thing that sets Ethan apart is his attention to detail. He pays close attention to fit and proportion, ensuring that every piece of clothing he wears is the right size and shape for his body type. He also pays close attention to grooming and accessories, often finishing off his looks with a stylish cap, sunglasses, or a carefully chosen piece of jewelry.

Aside from his successful career as an influencer, Ethan is also the owner and creative director of his own company called Every Other Thursday. The brand is a reflection of Ethan’s personal style and aesthetic. It offers a variety of streetwear and clothing items from card holders, to sweaters and t-shirts.

So, if you’re looking for a modest vintage lifestyle inspiration, by following Ethan you can learn how to dress in a way that is both fashionable and true to yourself.

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FASHION

The role of color in fashion

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The role of color in fashion

Fashion is one of the most important visual phenomena of our time, and in fashion, color plays a major role. In this background article, we share the difference between primary and secondary colors, discuss color combinations and contrasts, and the influence of color in the fashion industry.

  1. color
  2. decoration: such as embellishments or embroideries
  3. material: the fabric
  4. shape: the silhouette of a garment is defined by its pattern (the cut) and is described by words such as oversized or fitted
  5. A garment executed in one color is called uni or mono.
  6. A garment consisting of two colors is referred to as bicolor.
  7. Multicolor means multi-colored.
  8. Color blocking or colour blocking is when two or more different colors are used in a piece of clothing or outfit.
  9. Monochrome refers to an outfit that consists of one color from head to toe.
  10. Color Consultant gives consumers color and style advice. They advise clients on which colors and combinations suit them. The consultant distinguishes different color types based on their skin (warm or cool), hair and eye color. Sometimes the client receives a color passport highlighting the colors that suit him/her. A color passport can be useful when buying new clothes, as it can show which colors gave them a boost and which colors made a good combination. Retailers also sometimes hire color consultants to train their shop staff to give color advice to customers.

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FASHION

MassiveTop ten female runway models 2022: In Paris

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Top ten female runway models 2022: In pictures

Runway models

The spring/summer 2022 edition of the Haute Couture kicks off this week in Paris and the women’s wear collections start in February. These are the fresh faces we hope to see walking in the shows. They herald from all over the world, runway models from The USA and Europe to Japan and Angola. Not only are they fierce on the runways they slay on Instagram with thousands of followers each

.Nationality: Brazilian
Mother Agency: Canvas Management, New York
Instagram: ___valente
Followers: 24K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Fendi SS22 Campaign
Fashion Shows: Balenciaga FW22: The Lost Tape; Z Factory SS22: Love Brings Love

runway models

Nationality: Angolan
Mother Agency: Da Banda Model Management, Angola
Instagram: blesnyaminher
Followers: 46.6K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Louis Vuitton LV Holiday 2021; Zara UNA SPLENDIDA GIORNAÍA
Fashion Shows: Chanel SS22; Isabel Marant SS22; Dior SS22; Salvatore Ferragamo SS22; Alberta Ferretti SS22 runway models

Nationality: Vietnamese
Mother Agency: Elite Paris
Instagram: nnguyenjade
Followers: 13K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Paco Rabanne Lookbook, Paco Rabanne fragrance
Fashion Shows: Chanel Pre-Fall 22 Metiers D’Art Show; Louis Vuitton SS22; Sportmax SS22

Nationality: Vietnamese
Mother Agency: Elite Paris
Instagram: nnguyenjade
Followers: 13K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Paco Rabanne Lookbook, Paco Rabanne fragrance
Fashion Shows: Chanel Pre-Fall 22 Metiers D’Art Show; Louis Vuitton SS22; Sportmax SS22

Nationality: French
Mother Agency: Women Management
Instagram: lolibahiaa
Followers: 24.4K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Saint Laurent Winter ‘21 campaign; ‘Jeunesse Dorée’ M Le magazine du Monde

runway models


Fashion Shows: Chanel Pre-Fall 22; Louis Vuitton SS22; Stella McCartney SS22; Givenchy SS22

Nationality: Japanese/French
Mother Agency: Bon Image Corp. – Tokyo
Instagram: mikaschndr
Followers: 107K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Vogue Japan ‘Mika Rocks’ and cover, Feb ‘22; Moschino SS22 Campaign; Louis Vuitton Holiday ‘21; British Vogue ‘The Jean Genies’ Dec ‘21
Fashion Shows: Chanel Pre-Fall 22 Metiers D’Art Show; Louis Vuitton SS22; Miu Miu SS22; Hermès SS22

runway models

Nationality: American (First Nations)
Mother Agency: IMG
Instagram: quannah.rose
Followers: 296K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Elle US digital cover Dec ‘21; Porter Magazine cover Dec ‘21; ‘Gaining Ground’ American Vogue Oct ‘21
Fashion Shows: Gucci Love Parade Pre-Fall 22; Chanel SS22; Chloé SS22

Nationality: Angolan
Mother Agency: Da Banda Model Management, Angola
Instagram: blesnyaminher
Followers: 46.6K

runway models


Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Louis Vuitton LV Holiday 2021; Zara UNA SPLENDIDA GIORNAÍA
Fashion Shows: Chanel SS22; Isabel Marant SS22; Dior SS22; Salvatore Ferragamo SS22; Alberta Ferretti SS22

Quinn Mora

runway models

Nationality: American
Mother Agency: DNA Models, New York
Instagram: quinnelinmora
Followers: 16K

runway models
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: ‘High Performance’ W Magazine Dec ‘21;
Vogue Korea Cover Dec ‘21
Fashion Shows: Chanel Pre-Fall 22 Metiers D’Art Show; Celine SS22; Miu Miu SS22; Hermés SS22

Steinberg

Nationality: Angolan
Mother Agency: Da Banda Model Management, Angola
Instagram: blesnyaminher
Followers: 46.6K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Louis Vuitton LV Holiday 2021; Zara UNA SPLENDIDA GIORNAÍA
Fashion Shows: Chanel SS22; Isabel Marant SS22; Dior SS22; Salvatore Ferragamo SS22; Alberta Ferretti SS22

Nationality: Angolan
Mother Agency: Da Banda Model Management, Angola
Instagram: blesnyaminher
Followers: 46.6K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Louis Vuitton LV Holiday 2021; Zara UNA SPLENDIDA GIORNAÍA
Fashion Shows: Chanel SS22; Isabel Marant SS22; Dior SS22; Salvatore Ferragamo SS22; Alberta Ferretti SS22

Nationality: Russian
Mother Agency: Avant Models Agency – Moscow
Instagram: st.einberg
Followers: 139K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial: Givenchy Pre-Fall ‘22 Lookbook; Dior Cruise ‘22 Campaign; Christian Dior SS 22 Campaign
Fashion Shows: Chanel Cruise 22 Show Dubai; Louis Vuitton SS22; Stella McCartney SS22; Givenchy SS22; Isabel Marant SS22

Yilan Hua

Nationality: Chinese
Mother Agency: The Face Paris
Instagram: yilan_hua
Followers: 68K
Recent Campaigns and Editorial; Max Mara SS22 Campaign; Fendi SS22 Campaign; Hermès ‘Upside Down’ Nov ‘21
Fashion Shows: Celine SS22; Mugler FW 21; AZ Factory SS22: ‘Love Brings Love’FROM CATWALK TO CLOSET

Read more about the role fashion weeks play and how they influence fashion.In this extensive background article everything you need to know about fashion trends.

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